Spa Scandinave Les Bains Vieux Montréal

When you enter Spa Scandinave Les Bains Vieux Montréal, it is a very different Scandinave experience. Though the circuit is familiar, the setting is not. It feels like you are in a cave – in a good way. The sound from the waterfall in the warm pool rumbles throughout the dimly lit space. The noise of the city, even the time of day and the seasons melt away and you are in an intimate chamber that invites you to escape into silence and rest.

The two defining features of the space were the sauna and the rest areas.

The sauna has a large bed or rocks in the middle of the space which provides even heating and a nice focal point to the room. The backlit benches and sloped ceiling made for a really memorable space.

The rest areas were cozy spaces with two levels of rest. One for lounging and the other for napping. Both of these spaces were lovely, but the napping room was one of the best I’ve encountered. The dark helped me to drift off for a while and nearly forget that I had to be on my way. As usual, I could have stayed for days.

Spa Scandinave Les Bains Vieux Montréal is a quiet meditative urban spa experience. It’s a great place to go to focus your senses and to just be a body in a space.

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BC Hot Springs Circle Route: The Resorts

Supplement your next road trip adventure with some soaking in the swimming pool sized hot springs on B.C.’s Hot Springs Circle Route.

The B.C. Hot Springs Circle Route is a great road trip adventure. There are well over a dozen springs on the route, which circles the Kootenays between Cranbrook and Revelstoke in Southeastern B.C., Canada. Many of these springs are extremely remote, and though they are alluring, not all of us have the time or the four-wheel drive necessary to go hunting for wild hot springs. Luckily, there are a handful of developed springs that cater to the road-tripping family who like to stay “on pavement.”  These resorts are all places to spend a day by the swimming pool or to soak tired muscles in the hot mineral water after a long day of outdoor activity. These hot springs have all played a part in the history and development of the Kootenay region and each has stories of people miraculously healed by the waters. With the price of a soak hovering around ten dollars, they are a fun, healthy and affordable activity. What’s more, the landscape is itself captivating enough that even gazing out the car window as the scenery rolls by between is a satisfying way to spend the day.

Below are the Hot Spring Resorts in order if you head south from Revelstoke.

Swimming Pool and View at Halcyon Hot Springs

Halcyon Hot Springs is one of the more polished resorts on the route with three large pools and a great view. There is also a spa onsite for those who are looking for a bit of extra relaxation.

Nakusp Hot Springs has a north-south layout that is perfect for late night stargazing. Nakusp is a good starting point on the route if you are coming from the Okanagan or if you just want to make the area your destination. There are a number of wild hot springs near by and Halcyon Hot Springs is not far away either.

Ainsworth Hot Springs Cave

Ainsworth Hot Springs are not to be missed. The source of the springs is inside a large horseshoe shaped cave. The cave is completely covered in calcified mineral deposits and assessable for bathers to explore.

The Pool at Fairmont Hot Springs

Fairmont Hot Springs have a wonderland of facilities and activities that sprawl across the landscape. Not the least of which is their massive hot spring pool with a high diving board.

The Hot Pool at Radium Hot Springs

Radium Hot Springs is in Kootenay National Park. The facility is all terraces and walkways that look down into the hot spring pools and span the canyon that the springs are nestled in.

Roger's Pass Near Canyon Hot Springs

Canyon Hot Springs east of Roger’s Pass is truly RV heaven. It’s a perfect stop after a long day of hiking at Glacier National Park.

For more information on these hot springs and more go to http://www.bchotsprings.com/

Photos — Daniel Irvine and Natasha Irvine

Body Blitz

Body Blitz: Photo by N.Irvine

Nestled on a side street in downtown Toronto, Body Blitz is an urban day spa with the tag line “Health by water.” It is Canada’s first, women-only water spa and is a funky place to hang-out for hip Torontonians seeking to refresh and detox. As I caught my first glimpse of the water, I saw that I was about to enter a modern day Roman Bath dedicated to urban goddesses. Naked and barely dressed women were lounging in deep pools or on oversized and overstuffed chairs, while attendants circulated among them carrying trays of pre-ordered herbal infusions and health smoothies. The mood-lighting played up the facility’s brick walls, wood tones, and chunky metal fixtures creating a stylish and chic environment.

There is a recommended circuit for taking the waters at Body Blitz. It starts off with a shower before entering. This is a good thing to do at any facility for sanitary reasons, but at Body Blitz, it is part of the experience. The showers here are the most luxurious public showers that I have ever experienced. They completely drench you with thick heavy drops that massage you, falling with their natural weight. The frosted glass cubicles are well stocked with Body Blitz’s own brand of natural bath products that are light and fresh. They use lime and mint to energize your skin and scalp while you suds-up.

Water Circuit: Photo by N. Irvine

The first stop on the “official” water circuit is the sea-salt pool. The description says that it’s purpose is to warm and relax your body to prepare you for the steam room. After my steam I rinsed the accumulated toxins off my body and marched into the cold plunge. This is one of the best steps, but it takes some courage to get used to. You need to stay in a heat source long enough to actually feel the benefit of a sudden cooling down and you also need to stay in the pool, up to your neck, for one minute. Doing this actually closes and refines your pores while stimulating your thyroid and regulating your heart rate. I find it exhilarating, but this time I was glad to know that I was on my way to the infrared sauna immediately afterwards. Though I am a sauna veteran, this was my first experience with the infrared variety. An infrared sauna uses radiant heat, instead of conductive heat, to warm the body creating an arguably greater effect than a traditional sauna. It was a good experience, though I did not find it to be drastically different in any way. After this, I was off for a rinse and cold plunge before heading over to the immune boosting, green tea pool. I got there just in time for my energizing smoothie to arrive. It was so heavenly I did it all again. Twice.

My Fingers When I Was Finished: N. Irvine

Body Blitz is conveniently located in downtown Toronto: on 471 Adelaide street, between appropriately named Spadina and Bathhurst streets. The various spa treatments available should be booked in advance but are not necessary to enjoy the facilities. Check out the treatment menu and before you go to maximize your spa experience and go on a Tuesday for an extra good deal on your soak.

Ritual Bathing

Around the world, throughout history and in almost every culture there are rituals around bathing. For many the act of washing is not only external purification, but internal or spiritual as well. Even today, all the major religions in the world have a ceremony in which water is used as a symbol for spiritual purification; consider the various uses of baptism, bathing in the Ganges and the Islamic absolution ritual wudu.

In most of pre-Christian Europe and the rest of the world hot springs were sacred places. They often had temples built on or near them and became places of worship. A well-known example is Bath, England, where nearly two thousand years ago, a temple was built to Minerva near the hot springs. In the 3rd century, the Romans constructed the baths as we see them today.

St. Augustine

There is a traditional Finish saying, “Saunassa ollaan kuin kirkossa,” – you should be in the sauna as in a church. However, throughout history the Church has intermittently condemned bathing. Plato and Augustine’s separation of the physical and spiritual spheres vilified the body, condemned public bathing, and severed the connection between physical and spiritual well-being. Consequently, even in the 21st century many people incorrectly associate bathhouses only with prostitution and sexual activity.

Though bathing is becoming less associated with formal religious ritual in the west, practices such as yoga, meditation, and even pastoral care are associated with the growing spa industry worldwide. Even the decor at many spas references sacred spaces. There is usually an atmosphere and etiquette that encourages a quiet, meditative environment much like the Finnish recommend. People are encouraged to speak in soft voices, leave all distractions behind, close their eyes and breathe deeply. The atmosphere is, by nature, spiritual. Whatever your views, going to a spa will undoubtedly create a deeper harmony between your mind and your body; which were the original intentions of ritual bathing.

Urban Scandinave Awarded

Scandinave Les Bains Vieux-Montreal is part of the Scandinave Spa Group and the only urban spa of the four Finish style delights. It has been given the honour of the Governor General’s Award for Architecture 2010. The spa was designed by  Saucier + Perrotte Architectes. Watch their slideshow that shows the graceful light and lines of the spa and you will see why it deserves the distinction.